Wednesday, March 6, 2013

The Nature of Insecurity



Book Two of the Guardian Stories is submitted, oh happy day! This story has been up and down on my ladder of attention for most of last year. Now all I need is to work my way through my fabulous editor's suggestions and Vivienne will be ready to continue her adventure across the Kingdoms in search of Devon and her enemies.

Becoming a writer has been a dream come true in many ways. Perhaps the most drastic change has been in my relationships with other people. I have never been the most gregarious one in the group. Now as I find myself writing and promoting, I've made friends with other writers around the country. I admire each of them, not just because they are living their dreams and writing, but they all seem so confident about their abilities.

Big confession time here people: I have always been insecure. There are a variety of reasons, some of which are environmental, others are organic. When in college I found out "Speech Class" meant to give one, not just write one, I dropped the class rather than face my fear of public speaking. Even now, giving speeches or being on a question and answer panel requires days of mental preparation.

I used this crippling sense of unworthiness when formulating Vivienne. Born into a man's world, asked to complete a hero's quest, daunting tasks for anyone, much less a woman whose sense of self-worth is crippled and weak. Only as she grows in experience will confidence begin to mature. Much the way I feel as I navigate the oceans of literature.

Identifying with characters is important. If we don't feel their struggles then we cannot adequately tell the story to others. One of the things I insist in all my personal book choices is a good story line. I call it "The Well Told Tale". The characters I spend the most time listening to are the ones with which I feel the most in common. Such as Vivienne.

What other elements are required for a story to grab your attention? I'd love to know what entices other readers. Leave your thoughts and let's start a discussion on elements. Every story needs them, what happens when they don't meet your expectations?


16 comments:

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    1. Thanks so much! It truly has been a labor of love.

      And thanks for dropping by!

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  2. I have to be able to identify in some way to the characters/setting for a story to resonate with me. Stories that leave me cold are those with pages and pages of writing that doesn't move the whole story forward.

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    1. I understand completely. My first pass at Catalyst was about 150,000 words. My editor's first comment? Cut the backstory. Weave it in a little at a time. While I want to know context, I don't always want a lecture!

      Thanks for stopping by!

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  3. Congrats on your second book....I have always been insecure myself in what to begin with and I am just learning! I have already gotten such supportive advice from so many that it makes my heart soar! If you have one book down, and on your way with your second one.....you are doing something right...insecure or not!! I think your amazing! sandysandereellasmusings

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    1. Thanks! I started with a great idea and went from there. The first take was horrible, so I went back to the drawing board.

      Thanks so much for stopping by! and Good Luck! If you need advice, just reach out.

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  4. That's funny about the speech class. You'd kinda think that writers would be good public talkers. But, really, since our trade banks on isolation while creating, it's no wonder. I've been attending Toastmasters International meetings and am considering joining to improve that skill. Maybe drama classes would help too. I've always been too shy to stick with drama though.

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    1. Now, I always liked drama, because I could be someone other than myself. That I could do! Strange the way insecurity can work. We can be someone else, but not ourselves. Is that perhaps an ourgrowth of writing, of the many characters running around in our heads. I don't know, but it sounded good!

      Thanks so much for stopping by!

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  5. Hi Nancy, I agree with you about identifying with characters. If we don't feel their struggles then we cannot adequately tell the story to others.

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    1. Exactly. And, we have to get those emotions and struggels across to the readers in a manner that endears them to the reader.

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  6. Great post, Nancy! I totally hear ya on the speeches. I used to have to give them for my EDJ (aka Evil Day Job) one day I realized that I was freaking out because of the fear everyone associates with public speaking--not the event itself! LOL! I'm much better at it now ;).

    I also agree with connecting to the character. I've thrown books across the room if their characters just don't pull me in.

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    1. If I had a job where I had to give speeches, I would have to find a new job lol!

      Thanks for visiting! Come back again

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  7. Congrats on Book 2.
    Connecting with the character is probably the most important to me. I also like my description lightly salted.

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    1. Salted, not stirred!

      Thanks for stopping by!

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  8. I found your great blog through the WLC Blog Follows on the World Literary Cafe! Great to connect!
    Please visit my blog when you have a chance. http://waynelmurphy.blogspot.com/
    Thanks, have a great day!

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  9. I found your great blog through the WLC Blog Follows on the World Literary Cafe! Great to connect!

    ReplyDelete